Welcome to SalFar's webspace. SalFar is a project co-funded by the North Sea Region Programme 2014 - 2020.

Project Focus
Climate change is a global challenge that will have a major impact on the North Sea Region, affecting costal areas in a variety of ways. The SalFar project focuses on the degradation of farmland due to salinization. The main driver for increased salinization in the North Sea Region is the continuous rise in sea level. Sea level rise leads to leads to increased seepage of seawater, a higher risk of flooding, pushes seawater further inland and in time will lead to ever increasing salinization of farmland in the North Sea Region as well as in other parts of the world. Without adequate countermeasures this will lead to loss of food production capability and severe damage to costal economies.


How does SalFar deal with this challenge?
We develop innovative methods of costal agriculture across the North Sea Region by setting up field labs in each partnering country. In the field labs a multidisciplinary team consisting of climate experts, researchers, educators, farmers, entrepreneurs and policy makers, will be doing scientific research on the salt tolerance of various crops, demonstrating alternative methods of farming under saline conditions and creating new business opportunities for farmers, food producers, and entrepreneurs.

 

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Latest Project News

Regional Business Strategies will lead to local activities and mutual learning

23 March 2021

The aim of the SalFar business strategies is to paint a picture of the political framework under which the innovative farmers and food producers are w…

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New Toolkit for Quality Documentation

23 March 2021

Saline farmed foods may differ from foods grown in non-salty soil due to plant physiology. With sensory analysis you can learn how consumers rate your…

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SalFar field trials featured in BBC World’s ‘Follow The Food’

23 March 2021

BBC World’s ‘Follow The Food’ visited Iain Gould, Senior Lecturer in Soil Science at the University of Lincoln and Lincolnshire Farmer, David Hoyles, …

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Studying the effectiveness of a bladderwrack-based fertilizer

22 March 2021

As part of the SalFar project, Ökowerk Emden has developed a fertilizer called “Hoorn-Power” that consists largely of residual materials from the sea.…

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Students conducting research on aspects of saline agriculture

22 March 2021

For the next three months, six students from the VU University in Amsterdam will be doing research on economic, producer, and consumer perspectives of…

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