In the Netherlands we have already launched a first spin-off of the CATCH project

20 February 2019 - Published by Manon van de Riet
As one of the first activities for the CATCH+ project, a spin-off of the EU-INTERREG project CATCH, employees from the cities Enschede and Zwolle, the Waterboard Vechtstromen and the Province Overijssel as well as researchers from the University Twente and Saxion came together to learn more about the cities’ approaches to climate change adaptation.

As one of the first activities for the CATCH+ project, a spin-off of the EU-INTERREG project CATCH, employees from the cities Enschede and Zwolle, the Waterboard Vechtstromen and the Province Overijssel as well as researchers from the University Twente and Saxion came together to learn more about the cities’ approaches to climate change adaptation. First Bachelor student Susan Groenia presented the findings of her thesis research: She analysed and compared what the two cities had done in the last few years with regard to climate change adaptation and how their approaches differed. Afterwards there was a lively discussion on the benefits and drawbacks of the different approaches but also questions about how these evolved and what made them necessary or the preferred options.

When everyone was all talked out the group braved the cold temperatures to look at some of the adaptation projects they had spent the last few hours discussing. Hendrikjan Teekens from Enschede municipality had prepared an impressive tour along some of the climate change adaptation highlights in the city. The group got to see the huge storage pipes that were about to be put in the ground at Oldezaalsestraat, stopped at the heat sensor on the van Heekplein and cycled along the future course of the Stadsbeek. The Stadsbeek is a creek that will catch rainwater from the surrounding areas and makes it possible to decouple rainwater from the sewage system. The tour ended at the new Wadis in the yards at Rembrandtlaan that now catch and retain the rainwater from the roofs. If they are full they will also discharge into the Stadsbeek. The most remarkable aspect of that project though are its social impacts. Inhabitants were actively engaged in the planning of their backyards and the feeling of ownership is reflected in the frequency with which they use their pretty new yards – at least when the weather is warmer.