About

A summary of the G-PaTRA project

G-PaTRA – Green Passenger Transport in Rural Areas – is a consortium of 13 partners from across Europe who have been awarded funding by the European Union Interreg North Sea Region programme to take forward a project on green transport in rural areas.

The project, which will run until 2021, is led by RGU working in collaboration with partners from UK, the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany, Norway, and Belgium. It will promote green transport and mobility by enhancing the capacity of authorities to reduce CO2 from personal transport in remote, rural and island areas. It will embed more zero emission vehicles in rural transport systems and improve available passenger transport resources.

“Rural public transport is high carbon, subsidy intensive and struggles to provide a viable alternative to the car,” said David Gray, Professor of Transport Policy at RGU’s School of Creative and Cultural Business, who is one of the researchers leading the project.

“Together with urban transport carbon reduction strategies rarely being transferrable to rural areas, innovations in green rural transport are sorely needed to help governments meet ambitious carbon reduction targets.”

G-PaTRA will promote green transport and mobility by enhancing the capacity of authorities to reduce CO2 from personal transport in remote, rural and island areas by embedding more zero emission vehicles in rural transport systems and by improving, optimising and better integrating available passenger transport resources. Rural public transport is high carbon, subsidy intensive and struggles to provide an alternative to the car. Furthermore, urban transport carbon reduction strategies are rarely transferable to rural areas. The unique territorial challenges of rural areas have received limited attention from funders. Learning is required to enhance the capacity of rural transport authorities to reduce CO2 from transport. The project will demonstrate the technical innovations required, and the institutional, operational, social innovation changes needed, and then transfer these new techniques to a wider range of North Sea Regions (NSR). By better understanding the legal, regulatory and funding regimes in partner countries, the project will also ensure that innovation is transferable between jurisdictions. The project results will be: Increasing the capacity of transport authorities to reduce CO2 from rural transport; Demonstrating that a minimum 10% CO2 reduction can be generated from innovative transport interventions in remote, rural and island areas with the same or better mobility for the residents in question.